Grzeskowiak

"Dziadzio" - My Polish Great Grandpa: Adam Pawlowski (1879-1959)

"Dziadzio" - My Polish Great Grandpa: Adam Pawlowski (1879-1959)

My great grandfather, Adam Pawlowski (1879-1959) was known as “Dziadzio” by my mother and her generation. He was a quiet man, perhaps because he spoke little English. His hands seemed permanently yellowed from cigarettes and he had false teeth that he kept in a glass next to his bed. This is his story.

Agnieszka "Agnes" Szaroleta Grzeskowiak (1854-1918)

Agnieszka "Agnes" Szaroleta Grzeskowiak (1854-1918)

Agnieszka “Agnes” Szaroleta Grzeskowiak (1854-1918) was my 2nd great grandmother. She was married to my 2nd great grandfather, Albert Grzeskowiak (1849-1931). They came to the U.S. from Poland in the early 1880s and settled in Detroit, MI.

"A pugilistic neck, a powerful man, but essentially very meek" - Chester Joseph Stuve (1913-1978)

"A pugilistic neck, a powerful man, but essentially very meek" - Chester Joseph Stuve (1913-1978)

My 1st cousins, 2x removed, Chester Joseph Stuve (1913-1978) was "A good-natured fellow, an enthusiastic athlete, and a diligent student." Apparently his also had a strong neck. Here is his story as told through yearbook photos.

Pneumonia in Detroit: Franciszka "Frances" Grzeskowiak (1886-1905)

Pneumonia in Detroit: Franciszka "Frances" Grzeskowiak (1886-1905)

Pneumonia was one of the leading causes of U.S. deaths in the early 1900s. It took the life of my 2nd great aunt, Francisczka “Frances” Grzeskowiak (1886-1905). This is her story.

"Girl, 4, Is Witness to Murder" - Dolores Urkowski (1930-1978)

"Girl, 4, Is Witness to Murder" - Dolores Urkowski (1930-1978)

Dolores Urkowski is my 2nd cousin once removed. Tragically, she witnessed the murder of her 20 year old nursemaid, Jennie Zablocki, in 1933. This is what I know of the story.

The Valentine's Day Death of Edward Pawlowski (1905-1907)

The Valentine's Day Death of Edward Pawlowski (1905-1907)

My first cousin twice removed, Edward Pawlowski (1905-1907), died on Valentine's Day in 1907. He was one year, four months, and nine days old. This is his story. 

The Missing Decades of "Dear Aunt" Agnes Grzeskowiak (1898-1970)

The Missing Decades of "Dear Aunt" Agnes Grzeskowiak (1898-1970)

Agnes E. Grzeskowiak (pronounced gresh-KO-viyak) is my 2nd great aunt. She never married and had no children. Information about her during the three decades between 1940 and her death in 1970 remains elusive. Here is her story.

The Psychogenealogist Pic of the Week (#26)

The Psychogenealogist Pic of the Week (#26)

The Psychogenealogist Pic of the Week (#26) - The Grzeskoviak Family at Mt. Olivet Cemetery in Detroit, MI.

The Psychogenealogist Pic of the Week (#17)

The Psychogenealogist Pic of the Week (#17)

The Psychogenealogist Pic of the Week (#17) - A boy, his dog, and what I learned about mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA).

How to Use Facebook to Boost Your Genealogy Research: A Case Study

How to Use Facebook to Boost Your Genealogy Research: A Case Study

This is a story of how I discovered the power of Facebook to help my genealogy research. I hope you find these tips helpful.

The Stabbing of Albert Grzeskowiak (updated)

The Stabbing of Albert Grzeskowiak (updated)

The story of how my 2nd Great Grandfather, Albert Grzeskowiak, was stabbed with a chisel in the streets of Detroit in 1910. 

5 Easy Ways to Celebrate Your Family History on Holidays

5 Easy Ways to Celebrate Your Family History on Holidays

Are you hosting a Thanksgiving or holiday gathering this year? If so, it is a great time to explore, share, and celebrate your family history. Whether you are a serious genealogy buff or new to exploring your family story, here are 5 simple and fun activities you can try.

My Grandmother, Claire (Pawlowski) Halvangis, and The Election of 1916

My Grandmother, Claire (Pawlowski) Halvangis, and The Election of 1916

On August 15 of 1916, my grandmother, Claire (Pawlowski) Halvangis, was born in Detroit, MI. Her parents, Adam Pawlowski and Mary Grzeskowiak, were Polish immigrants and came to the United States somewhere in between 1880 and 1900. This was the very first blog post at The Psychogenealogist!